CJC Creative Jazz Club gigs

Daniel Cho / Leo Coghini

Cho (3)Last week brought us another emerging artist’s gig and this time it featured a Wellington band followed by an Auckland band. Each brought different aspects of improvised music to the bandstand and in a very nice touch, jammed together at the end; a happy meeting place between approaches. With so many international acts scheduled over coming months, it was great to see these young emerging bands given a shot: Again, this was good programming by the CJC.Cho (8).jpgThe Leo Coghini Quartet from Wellington took a straight ahead approach and it was obvious from the first number by Coghini, a solo rendering of ‘It Could Happen To You’ (Van Heusen/Burke), that he was an interesting pianist. He is classically trained, but with a good feel for swing oriented tunes. There were some nice originals in the set, but they were most comfortable on standards. I particularly liked the way they played Parker’s latin infused classic ‘My Little Suede Shoes’, also Kenny Garrett’s ‘Wayne’s Thang’. Both were approached in interesting ways (especially the nicely phrased Parker tune). The last number the quartet played was Stevie Wonders swinging groove classic ‘Isn’t She Lovely’ (which I have posted). Cho (6)In relation to ethnicity and gender, the modern New Zealand Jazz scene is increasingly reflective of the wider population; It is, therefore, good to see women picking up instruments that were once regarded as being exclusively in the male domain. Louisa Williamson was up front on tenor. She overcame some initial nervousness and played well. The other band members were electric bassist Zane Hawkins and Jeremy Richardson drums (both accomplished players).Cho

The second group, a quintet, had a very different approach. Their set list was entirely originals; they also took a loose no prisoners route. The set was clearly owned by the leader, altoist Daniel Cho. During his introduction, he placed a firm marker down; I am on a lifelong spiritual journey and this informs my music. While some ballads were played, he clearly favoured the ecstatic; that mood was reinforced throughout as he embarked on a very Coltrane fueled journey; and late Coltrane at that. His modal approach on some numbers would often move outside, at times leaning toward microtonality. In listening to him, one thing cut through above everything else, the deeper intent of the music; something beyond melody or harmony. This is a brave path for a young musician to take and one that requires enormous self-belief. He certainly possessed that attribute and he communicated it with a confidence beyond his years. Communicating intent is a hard thing to do; it’s selling an impression; it also requires audience deep listening.Cho (1)The tune ‘Within Hymn’ had clear references to Coltrane, but it was also interestingly modern. Although there were distinct parts to it, the piece made more sense as an entirety. It began with a bold statement on the horn, then unwound as it momentarily descended into chaos; next came the body of the piece, a building story, a probing at an idea, then changing again and ending with a climax. None of this would have been possible without the right support. Crystal Choi’s percussive chromaticism as she stabbed at the keyboard, the fourths, dissonant flurries; sometimes swinging as if to provide a counterbalance. Her solo was immaculate and each time I hear her now I’m amazed. Watching her musical journey encompass the avant-garde end of town and everywhere on the way is a treat.Cho (10) It was not just Choi who made this work, but Denholm Orr and Dean Rodrigues as well. Watch the clip through and judge for your self – these guys are amazing. Now a few bars of arco bass, now free or walking bass, and all the while, edgy polyrhythms dancing underneath. I was also pleased to see Kathleen Tomacruz on guitar – a very credible first gig for her.

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The stylistic divergence was fused in the last two numbers when the bands became one on the bandstand. The way they achieved such unity in an impromptu jam says a lot about them all. Big ups to the musicians.

Leo Coghini Quartet: Leo Coghini (piano), Louisa Williamson (tenor saxophone), Zane Hawkins (electric bass), Jeremy Richardson (drums).

Daniel Cho Quintet: Daniel Cho (alto saxophone), Crystal Choi (piano), Kathleen Tomacruz (guitar), Denholm Orr (bass), Dean Rodrigues (drums).

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CJC Creative Jazz Club gigs, Large Ensembles, Straight ahead

Sam Swindells: ‘Quiet’​ Octet

SSw (1)During the first half of 2017, a significant number of respected international artists and established local artists appeared at the CJC Creative Jazz Club. While everyone enjoys such a cornucopia of riches, it is also important to keep sight of emerging artists, those who are just below the radar. No local venue manages to showcase the rich diversity of improvising talent as well as the CJC.  This is no accident, as there is a guiding philosophy behind the programming of gigs. No artist, however good, gets an ongoing residency; the gigs, therefore, are different every week, are identifiable projects, and this keeps the audiences engaged. An important part of this is showcasing emerging artists.SSw (3)

Sam Swindells recently completed an Honours degree at the University of Auckland Jazz School and although not a new-comer to the scene, it is his first gig at the CJC. I recall someone telling me that his Honours recital created a buzz; that those who attended were impressed by it. On Wednesday he brought us that project and it was well received. One of the exciting things about the New Zealand Jazz scene is the growing strength of the writing and arranging. In Swindells case, he has taken a path less trodden; arranging and composing for an unusually configured brass-heavy octet. His inspiration was the stunning 1990’s John Scofield octet album ‘Quiet’.

When arranged music is at its best, the skillful management of contrasts is at its heart; tension and release, textural variance, tricks of modulation, surprise, clarity emerging from density; and if done well, presented as a coherent whole. This was an ambitious project, but in spite of that it worked. I would like to see Swindells develop the concept further, write or arrange more material like this, coral a group of musicians and rehearse them to within an inch of their lives. I have long thought that the nonet/octet ensemble form is under represented in Auckland (better represented in Wellington).SSw

There are some marked stylistic differences between the Scofield ‘Quiet’ band and Swindells’. Scofield used an expanded ensemble, which at times numbered eleven and included tubas, French horns, English horns and bass clarinets (and an acoustic guitar). Swindells worked with a smaller palette and in spite of being brass-heavy, he managed to achieve a delightful airiness. With fewer instruments utilised, the arrangements were closer to Frisell’s ‘This Land’ in effect. The combination of brass instruments (flugelhorn, trumpet, and two trombones) acted as a counterweight to his guitar and that required skillful arranging.SSw (4)The first number was ‘Tulle’ from the Scofield album, after that we heard a number of his own compositions interspersed with standards. His ‘Who is Kenneth Meyers?’ appealed as did an angular rendition of ‘Surrey with the Fringe on Top (Hammerstein). Given the project in hand, it was unsurprising that he included ‘Boplicity’ by Miles Davis; ‘Birth of The Cool’ being the springboard from which all such arranging sprang. In the second half we heard trumpeter Mike Booth’s ‘Major Event’ – Booth is a skilled arranger and an experienced ensemble composer. It is possible that he has also influenced Swindells’ direction.

The octet was a mixture of older hands and younger musicians. The ever popular Finn Scholes on trumpet, Mike Booth on trumpet and flugel, Jonathan Tan and Jonathan Brittain trombones, Roy Kim alto saxophone and flute, Wil Goodinson bass and Tom Leggett drums. The stand out instrument was the guitar – A confident and competent performance from Swindells throughout.

Performed at the CJC Creative Jazz Club, Thirsty Dog, K’Rd, Auckland, August 2nd, 2017.

 

CJC Creative Jazz Club gigs, experimental improvised music, Post Millenium

Chris Mason-Battley Group

CMB (1)Hearing people talk about the Chris Mason-Battley Group reminds me of the Hindu parable – the blind man and the Elephant.  “Oh yeah, that guy has a smooth sweet sound’ one said as if that settled the matter. Well yes, he has got a smooth sound when playing a ballad, but anyone who thinks that defines his music has simply not been paying attention. This band has enormous depth; playing anything from a melodic ballad to music that is way off the grid. What we experienced on Wednesday was music with integrity; at times raw and inventive, drawing us into its heart, emotionally engaging and above all satisfying.  CMB  The first number was ‘Mountain Song’ (by CMB); then they moved to a series of pieces from the CMB John Psathas project ‘Dialogos’ (progressing through excerpts from ‘Song for Simon’ and ‘Demonic Thesis’). As that set progressed we heard a new composition or two and lastly ‘Tahuna Caravan Park’ from his ‘Two Tides’ album. This gave us a broad sweep of his past projects and the Psathas album in particular. Dialogos was widely acclaimed as an exciting and bold step forward for the band – I can highly recommend the album (out on Rattle). Before the band left the stage for a break, Mason-Battley said; “That was the nice half – the second set is nasty half” (quoting from an album titled ‘The Jaberwocky comes to Town’ which had a ‘nice side’ and a ‘nasty side’.)CMB (3) As pleasing as the band were in the first set, they reached much deeper for the second; pulling out an utterly engaging and masterful performance. It began with several of the blacker pieces from ‘Dialogos’, ‘The Calenture Suite’. The drummer Stephen Thomas must be mentioned at this point – His work was integral to the overall performance and it underlined his maturity as a musician. At times subtle, at others incredibly complex – and all made to look easy in his hands. Thomas was extraordinary throughout and although a relative newcomer to this long-established band, his searing flames licked at their underbelly, an indispensible presence. In perfect contrast to the complex drum flurries was Sam Giles on electric bass. Giles is a master of the ostinato – repeated motifs, perfect time feel and the voodoo factor writ large. He is also an influence on the bands direction; favouring Zorn like explorations and paths less trodden. CMB (4)The CMB Group keyboardest is David Lines, an intersting and in my view under-rated musician. On this gig he played a Roland RD-700. What a beautiful piano and Rhodes sound. A  machine hardly heard these days, replaced by the Nord Stage or modern Korgs. While the newer keyboards have more bells and whistles, I am unconvinced that their piano sound is an improvement. Perhaps it sounded so good because of Lines touch? He is not a busy pianist and every note counts, in this gig his often voice leading role was perfect for the project (his solos were stunning). I only wish we saw him more often.

As good as the rest were, Mason Battley stood out; especially on soprano and alto. He has a real stage presence and his luminous lines are always well conceived. It is great to hear him reaching ever deeper as time goes by. The number I have posted is a tune of his titled ‘Drum Dance 4 (Psathas)’; a Coltrane-esk exploration that exemplifies a way-point on their interesting journey. On that tune, everything is in perfect balance, Thomas taking a leading role while the others work off that, each bar taking us deeper, highly charged and sparse.CMB (2) The last tune of the evening was free and political. It was titled ‘The Emperor Has No Clothes’; an obvious reference to the greedy authoritarian amoral elites that hold sway in the world; particularly the Trump administration.  It was free and it was raw emotion – in the background a loop recited ‘billions and billions’ – then, faintly at first, we heard the strains of ‘The Star Spangled Banner’. The band read the mood of the audience well with that one – people stomped and cheered afterwards as if someone had taken the words right out of their mouths and rendered them into abstract musical form.

CMB Group: Chris Mason-Battley (soprano, alto, tenor saxophones, compositions arrangements, electronics), David Lines (keyboards), Sam Giles (electric bass), Stephen Thomas (drums) @ CJC Creative Jazz Club, Thirsty Dog, K’Rd, Auckland, July 26, 2017

CJC Creative Jazz Club gigs, Concerts - visiting Musicians, Straight ahead

Rubim de Toledo (Canada)

Rubim (1)There have been two bass-player led groups at the CJC in as many months and both have been excellent. Last weeks featured group was a trio led by Rubim de Toledo: a Canadian from Alberta, of Brazilian origin and a well-established musician. Like many modern improvisers, his influences are diverse; that said his music fits squarely into the Jazz mainstream. The first thing to grab me was his big rounded tone, gifting the tunes with a richness and beauty that captivated from start to finish. While most bass sits deep within the mix, de Toledo’s voice spoke clearly; not by overcrowding his band-mates nor by punching through the others as an electric bassist might, but because every musical utterance sounded right. His melodicism and clarity of ideas were enhanced by devices which I found appealing; his occasional and appropriate use of vibrato at the end of a line, sometimes, rarely, he combined this with a slight bending of the note. He is definitely a successor to the Evans trio model; a bassist who communicates as an equal.Rubim (2)In a live setting and with unfamiliar sidemen, the best plan is to loosen the reigns. This he did and with Kevin Field on Rhodes and fellow Canadian and long time friend Ron Samsom on drums the gig gelled. Much of the gig showcased his compositions, some from his 2014 album ‘The Bridge”. The three standards he played were a killing version of Maiden Voyage (Herbie Hancock), Work Song (Nat Adderly) and a rendering of ‘Recordeme’ (Joe Henderson). His own compositions ranged from the thoughtful ‘Autumn Celeste’ to evocative panoramic tunes like ‘The Gap’ (about the Rockies) and ‘Red Eye’ (about a Brazilian train known locally as the train of death). The gig was a pleasure from start to finish and the enthusiastic audience response said it all.RubimAs I was leaving de Toledo handed me a copy of his recent album ‘The Bridge’ and it wasn’t until yesterday that I found time to play it. What a truly beautiful album this is; beautifully crafted arrangements and tunes which burn with a quiet intensity at any tempo.  On ‘The Bridge’, he is surrounded by an ensemble of talented Albertans and a guest artist from the USA. The lineup of bass, trumpet, saxophone, trombone, keyboards, drums (and on track 8 a vocal) is well conceived – balancing airiness with textural richness. The musicianship throughout is noteworthy; particularly Sean Jones on trumpet, a well respected musician from the USA: the keyboardist and everyone making this album memorable. As you would expect with an ensemble and with an album as skillfully recorded as this, de Toledo is less dominant. Here he lets his charts tell the story and they certainly do.

. The audio clip is ‘Winters Here’ from the album.

Rubim de Toledo Trio: Rubim de Toledo (upright bass, leader), Kevin Field (Rhodes), Ron Samsom (drums), The trio played the CJC Creative Jazz Club, Thirsty Dog, K’Rd Auckland, July 19, 2017.

The Bridge (Album): Rubim de Toledo (bass), Guest artist: Sean Jones (trumpet), Jim Brenan (saxophone), Carsten Rubeling (trombone), Chris Andrew (keyboard), Jon McCaslin (drums), Allison Lynch (vocals).Rubim (3)

CJC Creative Jazz Club gigs, Post Millenium, Straight ahead

Stephen Thomas – No Hawkers

Steve Thomas (1)In spite of his relative youth, Stephen Thomas is counted as one of New Zealand's better Jazz drummers. He approaches his craft with care and intelligence and it shows in his playing. While his technical skills are superb, he can also communicate on a human level and this is important as it speaks of character. Thomas is a regular on the scene, but like many sidemen and most drummers, he prefers to remain in the shadows. On Wednesday he changed that focus and convincingly staked his claim as band leader.Steve Thomas (4)The ingredients that contribute to a successful gig are often intangible, but this gig ticked a number of those boxes. While tailored to suit a Jazz audience, it did so without being remote or elitist. Another reason the gig worked was because Thomas used humour to good effect; not just his on stage banter but in the music as well. In a live setting this is important – interacting with the listeners on some level, bringing them inside the circle.Steve Thomas (3)Thomas has an abiding interest in the Ellington/Mingus/Roach, 'Money Jungle' recording and Wednesday provided him with a further opportunity to explore that project. While unusual as a source of standards material, it is a great album to focus on – the perfect vehicle for deconstruction. At the time it was recorded, it stood out for a number of reasons. In fact it shouldn't have worked at all, as the trio members reputedly disliked each other. Each had marked stylistic differences and Ellington was of an earlier generation. Ellington told the others that what they would play on the record should be a collective decision; then he turned up with a set list of his own tunes. The one tune which was not Ellington's was by Juan Tizol – a man who Mingus had once been in a knife fight with and because of whom, he was sacked by Ellington. What should have been a disaster for many reasons was a success. A brave post-bop recording by artists firmly rooted in other eras.Steve Thomas

Chosen from the Money Jungle material were 'Wig Wise and 'African Flower' (Ellington). Both of these tunes were given interesting treatment. The latter rendered into a dreamy fusion like vibe and the former, given a wonderful vaudevillian twist; the head melody line played on an analogue Prophet 08 synth. Reverence and open exploration in equal parts.Thomas's own tunes were interesting as well. 'No Hawkers' was a cleverly constructed solo piece; his engaging beats triggering pre-recorded samples, which he played over. 'Rat Race' was another great tune, this time with the full ensemble.Steve Thomas (5)

The other two standards were Giant Steps (Coltrane) and 'Fascinatin' Rhythm' (Gershwin). His quintet featured Crystal Choi, Michael Howell, Tom Dennison and J Y Lee and what a great band they were. Choi was especially wonderful; she's comfortable in a variety of settings and she just keeps growing as a musician – she really digs in and the sky's the limit for her. Howell was also decisive in his playing and it really suited him. Lee and Dennison are seasoned professionals and we are never disappointed by either. I was still buzzing from Dennison's previous weeks gig on electric bass – that boy can do no wrong.

No Hawkers: Stephen Thomas (arrangements, drums, samples), Crystal Choi (keyboards), Michael Howell (guitar), J Y Lee (alto saxophone), Tom Dennison (upright bass) – CJC Creative Jazz Club, Thirsty Dog, K' Road, Auckland, July 12, 2017

CJC Creative Jazz Club gigs, Post Millenium, Straight ahead

Tom Dennison Quintet

Tom D (6)Dennison is a first class musician and someone we don’t hear nearly enough of on the Jazz circuit. He rarely gets to the CJC but when he does it is always a treat. These days he is mostly found doing session work or backing visiting artists and it is hardly surprising that he is a bass player of choice. Whether on upright bass or electric bass he is equally proficient; always an engaging presence, always demonstrating a deep musicality. He has one more string to his bow which can’t be overlooked and that is composition. His tunes are often whimsical, but whatever the mood, a deftly crafted structure sits beneath every phrase. Never over done, bass driven and just right. There is also a thread of melancholia and wistfulness in his ballad writing: these are difficult emotions to evoke and anyone with knowledge of poetry will know, that only the most skilful poets do the moods justice. Dennison can.Tom D (4)Passels playing was another high point of the evening for me. He just gets better every time we hear him. He is also exactly the right person to interpret mood. I liked the way he approached the tunes, working his way inside them methodically. Sometimes angular, at other times teasing at the melody. During the ballads, he often began with sparse phrasing, establishing mood without overstatement; then, slowly telling his story as if looking at the theme from differing viewpoints. Although he plays decisively, he carefully modulates; generally without flourish or vibrato – pushing at a note until subtle multiphonic textures form – his paper-thin Konitz-like tone saying more than any honk. His versatility is also an asset. Any player who can comfortably move outside and inside while still maintaining a theme is a person worth listening to.Tom D (3)McAneny, who initially faced a cable problem, overcame it quickly and delivered a fine performance. Having a Rhodes and a guitar together can be problematical, but the charts and McAneny’s nimbleness enabled him to avoid crowding the space. Howell gave a nice performance and his lines are terrific; He knows what he’s doing but I’d like to hear him bite into his solos a bit more. Drummer Adam Tobeck was on solid ground with this group, he obviously enjoyed the company and reacted well to whatever was thrown his way. After not playing here for a few years, he is now a regular on the bandstand. I like his drum work very much.

Dennisons post-Zoo material is terrific. Fresh, adventurous and deeply appealing. I hope this gig presages a ‘Zoo Two’ album (or ‘Zoo Two by Two’?).  From Zoo we heard ‘The Cat’ – of the newer material there were many great pieces – I loved ‘Unkindness’, also the punkish take on the Beatles ‘Day Tripper’ and ‘J Y Lee’ (a contrafact of ‘Donna Lee’ which in turn is a contrafact of ‘Indiana’).

Tom Dennison Quintet: Tom Dennison (5 string electric bass, compositions), Callum Passels (alto saxophone), Connor McAneny (Rhodes), Michael Howell (guitar), Adam Tobeck (drums). CJC Creative Jazz Club, Thirsty Dog, July 5th 2017.