Sanctuary ~ Lovell-Smith/Baxendale

If you follow the New Zealand improvised music scene, you need to check out  ‘Sanctuary’, a collaborative album released by the Wellington-based saxophonists’ Jasmine Lovell-Smith and Jake Baxendale. And although the release date was only a month ago, it is already receiving significant attention, including from outside these shores. When you listen to Baxendale’s Walt Whitman referencing ‘Leaves of Grass’ Suite or Lovell-Smiths gorgeous ‘Sanctuary’ suite you will understand why.

The album is replete with imaginative writing. Of tastefully painted brush strokes from an unusually rich colour palette, and this enabled by the configuration of the eleven-piece ensemble. It is saying something important but never at the expense of approachability, for example, Baxendale’s suite, the opener, brings Mingus to mind. Mingus in a Felliniesque wonderland.  

The album is getting cut through because it is superbly realised and above all because it speaks convincingly of our times. In Lovell-Smith’s case, there is a distinct pastoral quality to her work and it invites us to reflect. This is similar to the approach that Maria Schneider takes, drawing attention to what is often passed over in haste and clothing the political in a softer raiment. 

Check it out here JasmineLovellSmith.bandcamp.com

Because of the writing and the quality of the musicianship, this is an especially cohesive ensemble; but nevertheless, the voices of the individual musicians shine through strongly. First and foremost among the soloists are the co-leaders, Baxendale on alto saxophone and Lovell-Smith on soprano saxophone, each featuring strongly on the album. Both give stunning performances. They have assembled a formidable line up here and no one falls short. Among the fine performances, Blair Lathem on bass clarinet and baritone, Ben Hunt on trumpet, Louisa Williamson on tenor, Hikurangi Schaverien Kaa on drums, Aleister Campbell on guitar and Anita Schwabe on piano (with her innate sense of swing). 

Baxendale is acknowledged as an important New Zealand composer and he has frequently been nominated (and has won) Jazz Tui awards. He is the spokesperson for the award-winning group The Jac (the winner of this year’s Tui with ‘A Gathering). He has travelled the world with his music and is associated with a number of New Zealand’s finest jazz units. Also a noted composer is Lovell-Smith who has resided, taught and performed in a number of countries, especially the USA and Mexico. Her return to New Zealand has enriched the scene here as she brings valuable insights and experience with her. Her innovative group the Noveltones is well worth catching.    

The subject matter for the two suites, and for the additional pieces are perfectly pitched. Whitman the beloved poet and humanist who spoke his truth in unforgiving times. His love of nature and his common cause with open-minded souls. And Sanctuary, that loaded word that evokes both safety and confinement. The album was recorded after our borders with the world had closed. And while the album evokes a sense of our enforced isolation, it also speaks to our interconnectedness; of human beings existing in a complex ecosystem, and hopefully realising that this is a rare window of opportunity. Music like this helps illuminate our way.    

To purchase or download the album visit jasminelovellsmith.bandcamp.com – Tell friends about it and support New Zealand music.  

Rachel Eastwood (flute), Ben Hunt (trumpet), Jasmine Lovell-Smith (soprano saxophone), Jake Baxendale (alto saxophone, bass clarinet), Louisa Williamson (tenor saxophone), Kaito Walley (trombone), Blair Latham (baritone saxophone, bass clarinet), Aleistair James Campbell (guitar), Anita Schwabe (piano), Chris Beernink (bass), Hikurangi Schaverein Kaa (drums) 

JazzLocal32.com is rated as one of the 50 best Jazz Blogs in the world by Feedspot. The author is a professional member of the Jazz Journalists Association, poet & writer. Some of these posts appear on related sites

Anita Schwabe @ the CJC

Anita (5)I was out of the country when Anita Schwabe performed at the CJC two years earlier. While I had seen her perform at the Bruce Mason Centre with the Rodger Fox Orchestra, I wanted to hear her in a more intimate setting. Her live (and recorded) performance on ‘Journey Home’ was impressive and as I recall a jet lagged Alan Broadbent watched her segments from the wings during the Auckland concert. As good as that concert and a later concert were, hearing an artist in close proximity is always a different experience. Schwabe didn’t disappoint. The first thing you observe when you meet her is her understated manner. Like many New Zealand improvising musicians she is self-effacing to the point of being dismissive of her own abilities. This contrasts strongly with the engaging confidence of her playing. From the first few bars you become aware that there is something special going on.

There is something of Broadbent in her ballad playing, perhaps even a hint of Evans, but she has a sound of her own. She initially evokes a sense of the familiar, but then you hear something deeper; a subtle richness underpinning her voicings. A lushness implied but not overtly stated and this quality lingers in memory long after the notes are played – above all she swings like crazy. Perhaps it was having Roger Manins, Ben McNicoll, Ron Samsom and Cameron McArthur in her band that created this particular rub. What ever it was they quickly gelled and played off each other like a band that had been together for years.Anita (6)Schwabe’s first number referenced the under-acknowledged and recently departed pianist Clare Fischer. “I like his unusual voicings”, she said before she played through her composition,’Fisching for Compliments’. The tune was intensely melodic, filled with clever references and a fitting tribute. Although a more reflective number (and her first of the night) we saw what she could do. The tune drew us in with a spacious intro and then imperceptibly we felt the swing. Block chords suddenly dissolving, close voicings appearing, disappearing; right hand running off the back of a phrase, subtly playing with time and rubbing against the chords in the left hand. This interaction between right and left hands created subtle and pleasing tension and we were to hear that often throughout the evening. That first number gave us a foretaste of what was consistently enjoyable music throughout the sets.

There were various ensemble configurations; trio, quartet and quintet. The bigger lineups with Manins and McNicoll were absolute cookers and the pair excelled themselves. An end of year holiday spirit had obviously descended upon them; the musicians interacting in a summery sweet spot. ‘The You Tube clip is ‘Fisching For Compliments’ (trio).Anita (4)The second number was a bossa, ‘No Winter Lasts Forever‘ and for that number she induced Manins (who is famously averse to putting aside his tenor), to play alto. There were whoops of delight and a lot of teasing, but Manins is killing on any of his horns. This was Manins at his formidable best. The saxophone deities of Conn and Selmer sensing the importance of the moment reacted and as he raised his alto, a halo of light formed directly above his head. This was clearly a sign of the gods pleasure. I have put the ‘alto’ bossa number up as the second sound clip. The last number of the evening titled ‘Anger Management’ burned with intensity (the first sound clip). This hard swinging Tyner-esk cooker had everyone on their feet. For Jazz lovers, burners like this are Christmas and New Year rolled into one and they fill us with endless joy.AnitaIt was great to hear McNicoll and Manins together – both playing their asses off and McNicoll sounding great on soprano. They obviously enjoyed playing together and we were the beneficiaries. Their different horns and their different approaches to soloing entirely complimentary. With McArthur, Samsom and Schwabe you had a formidable rhythm section. McArthur kept a wonderful pulse and Samsom was right in the zone, ever urging them to go one step further. This band floods the body with endorphins – they are a trip. A musician in the audience behind me said – “man that’s some rhythm section – some horn section – yeah thats how its done alright”. 

Anita Schwabe: (leader, piano, compositions), Roger Manins (tenor, alto), Ben McNicoll (soprano, tenor), Cameron McArthur (bass), Ron Samsom (drums). performing at the CJC (Creative Jazz Club), Britomart, Auckland 16th December 2015