CJC Creative Jazz Club gigs, Post Millenium, vocal

Louise Gibbs – The Seven Deadly Sins

Louise Gibbs (13) On Wednesday the UK-based vocalist, arranger composer Louise Gibbs brought her Seven Deadly Sins project to Auckland’s CJC (Creative Jazz Club). The audience, unrepentant antipodean sinners that they are, found much to enjoy. When premiered in the UK the project received much acclaim and in 2013 the ‘Seven Deadly Sins’ album’ was released. As I glanced through the liner note credits one name jumped out, Tim Whitehead; an important English saxophonist with equal facility on soprano, alto and tenor. For any number of reasons this is an album worth having. Louise Gibbs (10)The song suite has seven parts plus prologue & epilogue. This aggregation of cardinal sins does not originate with Peter Cook (as someone hilariously suggested) but comes to us from the fourth century AD. These very human failings were the obsession of the middle ages and Chaucer, Dante and Brueghel utilised the themes to great artistic effect (and often with rye humour). Debates on morality are still very much part of the public discourse as the dreadful events of Paris, the Lebanon and Mali remind us. Louise Gibbs (4)Gibbs invited us to examine the sins afresh; a parade of human failings as seen through a jazz lens. Her evocative contrasting pieces leaving us in little doubt as to which sin they represented; a strident drum solo during anger, the fulsome sound of the trombone for gluttony etc. It is unsurprising that the tenor saxophone portrayed lust; an entirely appropriate pairing given the repeated historic accusations of lasciviousness levelled against that sensual instrument. Louise Gibbs (5)The suite while highly arranged gave ample room for the soloists to demonstrate their particular vice. Crystal Choi was ‘pride’ on piano, Pete France was ‘lust’ on tenor, Haydn Godfrey was gluttony on ‘trombone’, Mike Booth was ‘envy’ on trumpet, Cameron McArthur was ‘sloth’ on bass, Steve Thomas was ‘anger’ on drums, Andrew Hall was ‘greed’ on alto & baritone. Gibbs was vocalist on all numbers including a prologue and epilogue. Many of the band members like Booth, McArthur, Choi and Thomas are regulars but we see Hall, France and Godfrey less often. That is a shame because they were amazing. Louise Gibbs (12)A shorter first set preceded the ‘Seven Deadly Sins’ suite – all Monk compositions. The band used stock arrangements but there was a sense of boisterous freedom in the renditions. This provided an appropriate segue to the second half. While everyone embraces Monk these days, his dissonant choppy lines certainly raised eyebrows back in his heyday. Monk was an iconoclast who channeled the rawness of the human condition through pen and piano. With the Seven Deadly Sins and its often dissonant passages we also experienced that. Louise Gibbs (14)Louise Gibbs has been teaching and performing in the UK for 30 years, but she grew up in Auckland. In recent years she moved away from a distinguished career in academia to concentrate on performance and composition. There is a confidence about her work and she is unafraid as a performer. Her voice can move from silk to raspy as appropriate to the piece. Footnote: Earlier I drew attention to Tim Whitehead (on the Gibbs album). He was once a member of Ian Cars ground breaking and popular group ‘Nucleus’ – the highly respected Kiwi born saxophonist Brian Smith was a founder member of that group.

The Seven Deadly Sins’ (New Zealand Septet) – Louise Gibbs (vocals, composition), Andrew Hall (alto & baritone saxophones), Pete France (tenor saxophone), Mike Booth (trumpet, Flugel),  Haydn Godfrey (trombone), Chrystal Choi (piano), Cameron McArthur (upright bass), Stephen Thomas (drums).

The gig took place at the CJC (Creative Jazz Club), Britomart 1885, Auckland 18th November 2015.

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CJC Creative Jazz Club gigs, Hard Bop, Straight ahead

Scott Taitoko Sextet @ CJC

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It was great to catch a sextet gig lead by a trombonist.   There are a number of trombone players about Auckland, but we usually see them buried in the centre of a Jazz orchestra or hiding in the shadows of an ensemble.  When they do appear in a brass section they enrich the palette and texture.  There is something special about that fat burnished sound.  The slurs, the rich colour tones, the pitch, and above all that hint of wistfulness that can hang in the air momentarily after the sound emerges from the bell: even mournfulness on occasions.

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Emerging in the late baroque period, the trombone has a lineage stretching back to the sackbut.  In Jazz lineups it is the saxophone family which dominates the brass instruments, closely followed by the trumpet.  The slide trombone and especially the uncommon valve trombone are rarer commodities.  This is the reverse of what occurs in the classical setting where saxophones are still regarded as interlopers.  While the instrument may not dominate modern Jazz lineups, listeners, musicians and composers alike hold a deep affection for it.  On Wednesday we heard Scott Taitoko perform a number of Hardbop era standards.  This was the high watermark for Jazz trombone (the Jazz orchestra not withstanding).  Hardbop leaders like Horace Silver and Art Blakey always included a bone and players like Kai Winding,  J J Johnson, Curtis Fuller and Frank Rosolino were never out of work.   IMG_3008 - Version 2 

As I went down the stairs before the gig, I could hear the sextet rehearsing a few bars of an uptempo J J Johnson number.  It sounded marvellous, as Johnson numbers do.  Later, well into the first set Taitoko performed the achingly beautiful ballad ‘Lament’ (also by Johnson).  This was a trio piece,  just guitar, bass and bone and it worked beautifully.   As Sam Taylor comped gently, Richie Pickard wove perfect bass lines; In Taitoko’s hands the melody filled the room and hung there in its melancholic splendour.  We all love the gorgeous arrangements and rich voicings of the familiar Gil Evans/Miles version or our own Wayne Senior’s chart (who arranged it for Nathan Haines on his ‘Vermillion Skies’ album), but it was nice to hear it stripped down to the essentials.  The other Hardbop composers who featured prominently were Horace Silver (who passed away just over a month ago) and Joe Henderson.   These are among the greatest composers of Hardbop standards.

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There was at least one original during the evening and that was a stunner.   Taitoko had penned it as a tribute to his grandmother and to the Marae he identifies with in the King Country.  The tune ‘Koromiko’ references his mountain, his Marae and his forebears.  We felt that connection strongly during the piece and the musicians clearly did too as they told the story with feeling.  I have put up a clip of Horace Silver’s ‘Tokyo Blues’.  A perennial favourite done well.  There were nice solos on this tune by Taitoko, Steele, France and particularly by Sam Taylor.  Steele could not have been better, taking a slightly oblique approach at the beginning, working with the complex meters and nailing it.

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There is a strong Christchurch connection to this lineup with Taitoko, Pickard, Taylor and Keegan all having strong connections with that city.  We see a lot of Pickard and Keegan these days and are the richer for it.  We hear the talented expat Scot, Pete France less often and more’s the pity.

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Who: Scott Taitoko Sextet – Scott Taitoko (leader, Trombone), Pete France (tenor saxophone), Matt Steele (piano), Sam Taylor (guitar), Richie Pickard (bass), Andrew Keegan (drums).

Where: CJC (Creative Jazz Club), Britomart 1885, Auckland, New Zealand.  1st October 2014

 

CJC Creative Jazz Club gigs, Groove & Funk

Dixon Nacey ‘Lets Sco’ Project @ CJC

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John Scofield is a magnet for guitarists world-wide, drawing them into the Jazz fold in ever-increasing numbers.  Locally, a similar thing’s said of guitarist Dixon Nacey.  The logic therefore that Nacey should do a Scofield project is inescapable.  That he should do it exceptionally well, unsurprising.

Playing a gig well requires a high degree of focus and anyone who has spent time around musicians will tell you that a type of disengagement from peripheral matters occurs just prior to any performance.  As the musicians busy themselves with a multiplicity of leads, pedals and last-minute adjustments you often detect withdrawal.  It is as if their sensory perceptions are being momentarily realigned.  Once the performance begins the focus changes again and what has been in deficit is given back ten fold.  Dixon Nacey is somewhat of an enigma in this regard, as his extravert good nature is evident on or off the band-stand, before, during and after a gig.  IMG_9683

He is cheerful and easy to engage with off the bandstand and when he plays a look of pure delight flashes across his face.  As the strings bend under his fingers and his beautiful Godin guitar moves with him, the effect’s magnified.  This is about the joy of creating high quality accessible music.  What he communicates in body language to an audience is as much a part of the music as the notes he plays.   To experience Dixon Nacey live is to receive a gift, because some of that joyous exuberance infects you as listener.  As the recipients of this you find yourself smiling throughout and feel very lucky.

I have seen John Scofield twice and his concerts are much like this.  Exuberant crowd pleasing and heavily groove based.  In spite of the fact that the material was nearly all Scofield compositions this was no slavish covers gig.   This was Dixon telling the Scofield story in his own way.  IMG_9665

When working on projects like this leaders know who they’d like to engage, but availability often defeats them.  Dixon was in luck here as he got exactly who he wanted.   On Nord C1 Hammond B3 was the often illusive Grant Winterburn.  Winterburn’s often talked about by Jazz musicians but seldom seen at club gigs.  As he set up his gear a musician whispered in my ear, “This is one of New Zealand’s best groove organ players and we’re lucky to catch him”.   The reason he is seldom seen is because he gets so much work with large production shows.  This cat has it all down.  The hard-driving grooves, the staccato chord work and a way of playing with time, tension and release that has you shouting encouragement and punching the air.  Moments before a killing run he appears to fall sideways while a hand snakes to the keyboard.  Sometimes he leaps up and jams his knee into the upper register.  These crowd pleasing antics mirrored Dixon’s moves perfectly and they were never at the expense of the stellar musicianship.

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There’s another band member seen far too infrequently and that’s Pete France on tenor saxophone.  The Scottish born France has the ability to coax lovely melodic ballads or raunchy groove numbers out of his elegant silver tenor.   I have caught him playing standards gigs but also tackling more challenging material.   I like the way he approaches tunes, never overly busy and often saying more with less.   It was nice to see him back at the CJC.   IMG_9676 - Version 2 IMG_9650 - Version 2

Once again drummer Stephen Thomas showed how valuable he is in a line up.  He gets plenty of top-level work these days and rightly so.  In recent years I’ve seen him excel in diverse situations ranging from gigs requiring sensitive brush work to firing up hardtop units.  For all that, I’ve not previously seen him in this context.  Scofield tunes have more twists and turns than a dangerous mountain road and he executed them to perfection.  Here he was locking down the beat as a groove drummer and adding that special something.  there was one non Scofield tune in the mix and that was the Booker T & the MG’s R & B classic ‘Green Onions’.  Thomas pounded this out like a born again rock god while freeing up the others to let loose (and they surely did).   Take my word for it the tune never sounded so good.  IMG_9637 - Version 2

The remaining band member was Junior Turua on electric bass.  Turua is always at the heart of the music and totally in the pocket; able to punch out mesmerising grooves, tasteful licks and solos.  It may be a cliche but this band is greater than the sum of its parts.  I stated earlier that I’d seen Scofield live, but in honesty I enjoyed this band just as much.

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The tunes traversed Scofields recording career with perennial favourites like ‘A go go’ and ‘Chank’ alternating with lessor know compositions like ‘Let the Cat Out’.  All of the musicians took delight in what the others were doing and their acute interaction amplified the intensity of the music.  As marvellous as the band was you can take nothing away from Dixon Nacey, whose virtuosity shines like a beacon.

The band do an Auckland University gig on the 10th March and I will certainly be there for that.  Hopefully it will be recorded by someone.

What: Dixon Nacey ‘Lets Sco’ Project – Dixon Nacey (guitar, leader), Grant Winterburn (Nord C1 Hammond B3), Pete France (tenor sax), Junior Turua (electric bass), Stephen Thomas (drums).

Where: The CJC (Progressive Jazz Club) 1885 Britomart Auckland.  26th Feb 2014.

CJC Creative Jazz Club gigs, Post Millenium

Alain Koetsier Band @ Finding Kiwi ‘Standards’

I have watched drummer Alain Koetsier perform over the last year and his credentials on the traps are unimpeachable.  Alain is a drummer with a modern feel and it is plain to see why so many of our top Jazz groups utilise him.  This was probably his first outing as leader and he had chosen wisely on two fronts.  His band mates were consummate professionals and their approach to the music was intuitive.  They interacted as if with one mind.  The second thing Alain did well was to select a set list of recent compositions by New Zealand Jazz Musicians.  I liked the concept.

People expect a band to play their own originals but when a set list focuses on a wider spectrum of Kiwi Jazz compositions it feels respectful.  It somehow lifts the tunes to another level of availability; a place of wider appreciation.  Doing this is a good start point in identifying our own ‘standards’ and some of the tunes played could well reach that bench mark.  As the scene continues to mature this will surely happen.

Alain & Dixon
Alain & Dixon

I was pleased to hear two tunes which had impressed me at recent gigs; ‘Dicey Moments’ by Oli Holland and the wonderful ‘Ancestral Dance’ by Nathan Haines.   Both of these new compositions are distinctive, clever and memorable.  Dixon Nacey compositions also catch the attention as he has a knack for locating the right hooks while providing a solid base for improvisation.The first set had contained ‘Bad Lamb’ (Dixon Nacey).    The tune had nice chordal voicings and the way it unfolded led us easily into the heart of the tune.

Another memorable number was ‘Tree Hugger’ by the Auckland-born bass player Matt Penman.   Matt has moved into the upper echelons of Jazz bass, occupying a respected place on the world scene.   Maybe he will return the compliment one day and acquaint North America with a few of the other compositions.

The gig was fun to experience and obviously fun to play as the musicians enjoyment of what they were doing was easy to discern.  Like many Jazz gigs there was a high degree of spontaneity and perhaps this came from being thrown in at the deep end.   Working musicians seldom have a lot of time to rehearse and when confronted by complex charts they appear to relish the prospect.

The musician that I was unfamiliar with was Pete France on tenor.   I know that he has played the CJC before and my friends tell me that they had hoped for his return one day.    His tone is rich and full and his improvised lines meaningful.   He is also relaxed on the bandstand and when you consider the calibre of his band mates this ease of manner speaks volumes.

Oli Holland

The band featured Oli Holland on bass.  His approach and focus drew you in inexorably as he demonstrated chops, impeccable timing and melodic invention.  His skills are considerable, as he can move from contrapuntal walking bass to melodic invention in an eye blink.   Oli gave his best, but then he always dies.

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Lastly I come to Dixon Nacey.  His playing is widely appreciated throughout the NZ Jazz scene. As good as he is, he always strives to do better.   His compositions sing to us and his chordal work and rapidly executed lines astound.    It is good to be in a town where this man is playing and long may it continue.

Well done Alain – more please.