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After the success of ‘Poets Embrace’ it is hardly surprising that Nathan Haines new album ‘Vermillion Skies’ has climbed so high in the charts.   The album was the fifth best selling New Zealand album the last time I looked and this happened within days of its release by Warners.  For a modern Jazz album anywhere to achieve this success is unprecedented.  This has followed hot on the heals of ‘Poets Embrace’ winning the Tui Awards ‘Best Jazz Album of 2012’. IMG_5902 - Version 2

Anyone who knows Nathan will hardly be surprised to learn of his obsessive commitment to the last two projects.  His approach has been Ghandalf like, as it involved a long period of woodshedding, an epic journey in search of analogue equipment and a reconciliation with the gods of past times.  While Poets Embrace plumbed the depths of Coltrane’s vocabulary, Vermillion Skies has opened up the perspective and tapped into the wider ethos of 1950’s Jazz.  What Vermillion Skies is not however is a cosy journey down memory lane.

It is about examining the epiphanies and sounds of the 50’s era and interpreting them with modern sensibilities.  With the exception of one number, these are fresh compositions; a happy synthesis between past and present.  Deliberately retro though is the analogue recording methodology.  A one-take take approach and sound augmented by the use of reverb (not using a plate).

I followed the Vermillion Skies project from its inception and because I was in contact with the musicians via Face Book it was not difficult to keep abreast of progress.  Alain Koetsier was returning from China, Nathan was returning from the UK and to use ‘GCSB speak’ there was a heightened level of ‘chatter’ about town.

Their fist gig was at the CJC (Creative Jazz Club) and at this point the tunes had never been aired before.   Some tunes were in embryonic form and they had only been rehearsed briefly.  We were a focus group Nathan informed us; musical crash test dummies.  The audience loved the gig but they knew that even better was to come.  644217_10152395531247588_299377990_n

A month later the musicians and veteran London Producer Mike Patto headed into the York Street studios to cut the tracks.  The album was recorded in around two days of mostly live takes.  To obtain an authentic reverb sound Nathan used the studio car-park, which is a huge cavernous brick building, resembling a stripped out Victorian cathedral.  The neighbours in the posh Edwardian apartments next to the studio lacked the cool to appreciate this innovation.  The reverberating horns made one of them complain (in tears) as the fulsome brassy sounds echoed across Parnell rise.

A few weeks after the recording Nathan contacted me and asked if I would interview him at York Street for the promotional video.   I turned up a few hours before the appointed time and asked Jeremy (who runs the studio) if I could hear the masters.  Hearing the material in its final form and in that space was a revelation.  I quizzed Jeremy and Nathan about aspects of recording.  I learned that the piano was isolated in a booth, but the drums and horn section were in the larger space with the saxophone.  When it came to the vocals the band went home; those tracks were recorded without onlookers.

Nathan has sung on a previous album but he readily admits that it is not his comfort zone.   It interested me that he didn’t have the same degree of confidence in his singing abilities as his voice is simply superb.   In my view it compares favourably with Mark Murphy’s.  The charts are well written and the hooks in ‘Navareno Street’ are so powerful that I am still hearing them in my head weeks later.

Interviewing Nathan Haines is a pleasure as he is knowledgeable, articulate and expansive when prompted.   Because he is across his topic he can talk at length about the minutia of the project, but what was surprising was they way he allowed me to discuss his vulnerabilities.  His warmth and often self-effacing commentary gave the interview an added depth.

On April 9th the official launch occurred at the ‘Q’ Theatre in Queen Street Auckland.  The tickets sold out quickly.  The theatre is well suited for such a performance as it has the space, sight-lines and well padded surfaces.  This enabled good sound control.  Unlike the CJC gig, there were twelve musicians appearing (not quite the full album line-up which had a 15 piece band on one track).   The first half featured the basic quartet with a few guest artists such as brother Joel Haines on guitar and two others.  Joel can channel the rock god thing while fitting perfectly into a Jazz ensemble.   His sound is modern but his lines are Jazz.  Also on stage was John Bell the multi talented vibist.  John Bell’s contribution added texture and depth.  He does not rely on heavy vibrato, favouring a more minimalist approach.  I reflected that I had last seen him in a decidedly avant-garde setting.   This was far from Albert Ayler but as always his musicianship impressed.  Mike Booth (lead trumpet in the horn section) also appeared in the first half.   Mike Booth has a clean tone on trumpet and flugal and is the go to guy for anything involving horn sections or Jazz orchestras.  His sight-reading skills are as impressive as his performance skills.

by John Chapman

by John Chapman

In the second set, a six piece horn section joined in and the arranger Wayne Senior conducted the ten piece band.   Wayne Senior is part of the history of New Zealand Jazz and he is especially renowned for his work with TV and Radio orchestras.  His ensemble arranging is legendary.  The six piece horn-section was two French horns, Two trumpet/flugal horns, a trombone and a bass trombone.

I love nonets and tentets as they have a big sound while leaving room for a band to breathe.   The textural qualities of this tentet and the rich voicings were particularly noteworthy.  ‘Frontier West’ (by Nathan Haines) left the audience gasping in delight as the ‘Birth of the Cool’ vibe in modern clothing gave us a rare treat.  Such wonders are seldom heard in this country.  The last item (and the only tune not written by Nathan) was the aching beautiful ballad ‘Lament’ by J. J. Johnson.   The best known version of this is on the ‘Miles Ahead’ album.  That Gil Evans arrangement involves a 20 piece orchestra.  Wayne Senior re-arranged this for tentet and the results are amazing.  Nathan caught every nuance of the tune as he built his improvisation around the rich voicings.   I am in no doubt that the ‘Lament’ on ‘Vermillion Skies’ compares favourably with the best historic versions (Miles, JJ Johnson, Rahsaan Roland Kirk).

The performances on the album and at the various gigs have all been different.  This is because it is Jazz where ‘you never play anything the same way once’ and because there have been personnel changes along the way.  As leader and player, Nathan Haines always seems to squeeze that bit extra out of each performance.  His intense focus on the tenor of late has been good for him and good for us as his approach to this material while fluid, never looses its edge.   He is arriving at that enviable place where people will say after one bar, “oh….that has to be Nathan Haines”.

Kevin Field and Nathan go back a long way and their chemistry is evident.  Kevin is the pianist of choice for many local and visiting bands.  As an accompanist he never looses sight of what an accompanist is there for.  He can shine during the piano solos, but his fills, deftly placed chords and subtle comping speak to his other strengths.  It was often necessary for him to keep out-of-the-way of the other instruments (such as the horn section which occupied a register that he would normally utilise).  Drummer Alain Koetsier returned to New Zealand for the recording and his drum chops and musicality had not subsided during his sabbatical away from Jazz performance.   He is a fine musician and sorely missed on the Auckland scene now that he resides in China.   The bass player Ben Turua is also rock solid on the recording.   I have heard him play often but never better than here.  Sadly he has since departed for Sydney, where he will no doubt flourish as do many Kiwi Jazz expats.

The departure of Alain Koetsier and Ben Turua left a gap and so the original recording lineup was amended for the gigs to include Stephen Thomas on drums and Cameron MacArthur on bass.  I cannot speak highly enough of Stephen Thomas.  He has been on the scene for a few years and if anyone was going to fill Alain’s shoes it would be him.  He is a hard-working young drummer who demonstrates his passion and skill every time he sits at the kit.   The other replacement was Cameron McArthur who is still a student at Auckland university.   This was a big step up for him and he took it with ease.   His bass solo at the ‘Q’ Theatre brought a huge applause and like Stephen Thomas we can expect great things of him.

This album marks another high watermark in New Zealand Jazz as it is brave enough to confront the past without being captured by it.  Nathan Haines is heading back to London in a few weeks and we can’t begrudge him that.   His ascendency offshore is our gain and we should never forget that these two great albums have been recorded in Auckland, New Zealand and with Kiwi musicians.

Who: The Nathan Haines Band.  Album – Nathan Haines (tenor sax, vocals, leader, composer). Kevin Field (piano), Ben Turua (bass) , Alain Koetsier (drums), Joel Haines (guitar – 2,5), Leon Stenning (guitars -5), Mickey Utugawa (Drums – 5), Mike Booth (lead trumpet, flugal), Paul Norman (trumpet, flugal), David Kay (French horn), Simon Williams (French horn), Haydn Godfrey (trombone), John Gluyas (bass trombone), John Bell (vibraphone 2-5), ‘Big’ Cody Wilkington (steel guitar, vocals, percussion – 5), Wayne senior (arranger, session/launch gig conductor). ‘Q’ Theatre and later gigs replace Koetsier with Stephen Thomas (drums), replace Ben Turua with Cameron McArthur (bass).

This is a Jazz April post – support Jazz April and International Jazz Day by visiting the Jazz Journalists Association website and JJA Facebook page

What & Where: ‘Vermillion Skies’ album gigs,  CJC (Creative Jazz Club) Brittomart, ‘Q’ Theatre Queen Street Auckland, various festivals and concerts.

Navareno Street audio clip:  

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