CJC Creative Jazz Club gigs, Concerts - visiting Musicians, Jazz April, Piano Jazz, Straight ahead, World Jazz Day/Month

Chris Cody @ CJC + Tauranga

Chris Cody 071 (2)When I saw that pianist Chris Cody was coming to New Zealand I immediately recognised the name. For a moment I couldn’t fill in the blank spots of memory but I sensed that the connection was both Australian and international. My CD collection is huge and I knew that the answer lay buried somewhere in the unruly muddle of music lying about the house. Then it came flooding back; Cody recorded a great ‘Chris Cody Coalition’ album in the nineties. The first international Jazz NAXOS recording titled ‘Oasis’ and produced by Mike Nock; an innovative exotic project brimming with warm middle eastern influences. Some quickChris Cody 077 research told me that the Chris Cody Coalition was still an entity and what equally excited me was to see the name Glenn Ferris on several of the albums credits. ‘Oasis’ featured the Australian Trombonist James Greening and on several of the later Coalition albums Cody features trombonist Ferris (an utterly distinctive player). His whispers, growls and smears are at times otherworldly, but also mysteriously human. Cody works especially well with trombone players and his writing reflects this on the latest album.

I trawled the Paris Jazz clubs in the nineties and recall seeing Ferris perform. Later I picked up an album by Henri Texier ‘Indians Week’ and loved it. Ferris has appeared on 179 albums; everyone from Stevie Wonder (‘Songs in the key of life’), to a co-led album with Chico Freeman and an Archie Shepp album (‘Meeting’). The new Chris Cody Coalition album ‘Conscript’ is enjoyable from start to finish. An accessible album that bathes you in warmth and light. There is real intimacy about the recording, a feeling that you areChris Cody 073 (1) in the front row and this is as much about Cody’s writing skills as the strong confident performances. It is also about the recording quality which is superb.  I strongly recommend this album. I first heard the quartet at the Tauranga Jazz Festival. A CJC Jazz stage showcased the finale and the Jazz Tui Awards presentation. I spoke to Cody in a break and quickly learned that he had New Zealand blood running in his veins. Born in Australia of Kiwi parents he studied music before moving to Paris. Based there ever since and gaining a strong reputation on the wider scene. He has very recently move back to Australia but he intends to return to Paris to work periodically.

It is the diversity of life experience that makes for interesting Jazz musicians and Cody has the aura of Paris cool about him. While he Chris Cody 072 (1)often draws on very American sources like Jamal, he is also in the mould of pianists like Jacky Terrasson (also a Parisian). Cody’s compositions are well thought out and replete with interesting asides. We heard many of these at the CJC and the album ‘Conscript’ is all originals. I am a sucker for a Cole Porter tunes and when he opened with ‘I love Paris in the springtime’ I couldn’t have been happier. Happy because I love the song and above all happy because the quartet played it so well. I have posted a video of the CJC performance and the title track from the ‘Conscript’ album with Ferris (the latter an official video release).Chris Cody 071 (1) His pick up band are the familiar and popular Roger Manins (tenor), Oli Holland (bass) and Ron Samsom (drums). In the rush of the Tui awards there was little time to rehearse, but it didn’t show. This is 3/4 of DOG and they are the 2015 Jazz Tui winners after all.

Who: Chris Cody Quartet – Chris Cody (piano), Roger Manins (tenor sax), Oli Holland (bass), Ron Samsom (drums). Where: CJC (Creative Jazz Club), Britomart 1885, Auckland, New Zealand, 8th April 2015 #jazzapril #jazzappreciationmonth http://www.jazzapril.com

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CJC Creative Jazz Club gigs, Jazz April, Large Ensembles, New Zealand Jazz Gigs

The JAC @ CJC & Tauranga

JAC 11-3-2014 071I first heard the JAC two years ago and I liked what I heard immediately. Their sound has textural complexity, but the charts are so well written that the band manifests as if it is a single organic entity. As they move through the pieces, rich horn laden voicings appear, shimmer and fade seamlessly into the next phrase. In spite of the heavy punch of the front line, the band can float airily over passages. This affords them choices that are seldom realised by larger ensembles. They have a real nimblenessJAC 11-3-2014 075 and this is surprising considering their large musical footprint. A bigger footprint than the size of the band would suggest. The really good nonets and octets achieve this.

The solid four-part horn line is the power house of the unit, while guitar and piano balance out the sound. I have to mention Cameron Allardice at this point as he is so integral to the JAC’s sound mix. I have heard them play with and without Allardice and with him is my strong preference. He has grown so much as a performer and soloist over the last year that I hardly know where to start. He is not a loud player but his authoritative solo’s and fills just sing. He gives a soft but penetrating edge to the mix.JAC 11-3-2014 072

I watched him at the Tauranga Jazz festival and he approached his solos like Rosenwinkel. Not so much in phrasing but in energy as he gained momentum during solos; lifting free of the earth as the sound flowed among us, like water over a spillway. And all the while maintaining an absolute clarity of purpose. These high wire acts require courage and confidence and he showed these attributes in spades.  He is also one of the main composers of the group and his charts are stunning.

This is an ensemble of stars and leader, altoist Jake Baxendale is certainly one them.  He can deliver searing heart stopping solos and then drop into the mix in an eye blink.  He is the other contributor of compositions (and arrangements) and his principle guidance that moulds the unit. His ‘Thieves in the Night’ is a masterpiece of composition. Their album ‘Nerve’, recorded early in The JAC’s life has wide appeal. Since its release they have been on the road (or gigging) almost constantly. The time on the road has sharpened them considerably and that must show in the new album; The recording session takes place in a few weeks and judging by the material that we heard at the CJC gig (and at The Tauranga Jazz Festival), an already polished band will jump up another notch.JAC 11-3-2014 076Every player is integral to this project but trumpeter Lex French certainly stands out. He arrived back in New Zealand from Montreal a seasoned performer; his credentials are impeccable. He is a strong ensemble player and during solo’s he pulls off feats of brass bravura that New Zealand audiences seldom hear. He has chops and ideas and the confidence to pull them off. I have at times worried about the meagre numbers of high-quality trumpet players on the local scene. French may well address this as he will certainly inspire others.

Daniel Millward on piano (and keys at Tauranga) gave impressive performances as did Chris Buckland (tenor) and Mathew Alison (trombone). Millward is a fine pianist but for some reason, probably the sound mix, he shone through more on keys at Tauranga. Buckland gave some stunning solos and again the Tauranga performances come to mind. Last but not least are bassist Nick Tipping and drummer Shaun Anderson.  Behind every solid group are musicians like these.  Tipping is the most experienced of the JAC musicians and he instinctively understands how to keep the groove. Linking rich and complex harmonies like these to the rhythmic flow requires just such a musician. Anderson likewise performs strongly.  Working with Tipping and bringing that big band drum feel to the unit. JAC 11-3-2014 074

If you love to hear well written charts played to perfection, referencing everything from fifties jazz up to modern times, purchase the JAC’s albums.  Once again we must acknowledge Rattle here. Without a quality local label like this, such albums would have less chance of being released. The JAC were deservedly nominated as finalists for the Jazz Tui 2015. Expect to see them nominated next year.

Who: The JAC – Jake Baxendale (alto, compositions, flute), Lex French (trumpet), Chris Buckland (tenor), Mathew Allison (trombone), Callum Allardice (guitar, compositions), Daniel Millward (piano, keys), Nick Tipping (bass), Shaun Anderson (drums).

Where: The CJC (Creative Jazz Club) Britomart 1885 Auckland 1st April 2015 and The Tauranga Jazz Festival Easter Weekend 2015.

Additional: Rattle Records  and  Tauranga National Jazz festival

CJC Creative Jazz Club gigs, Post Bop, Review

Phil Broadhurst Quartet updated

Phil Broadhurst

I last saw this band at the launch of Phil’s ‘Delayed Reaction’ album.    That was September 25th 2011 and things have moved on apace since than.   For a start the album has had universally good reviews, reasonable airplay and attracted interest from offshore.  For a number of reasons it was bound to do well.  I suspect that the quality of the interpretations and the musicianship of the band clinched the deal.    While a number of well-chosen Petrucciani tunes are featured in the album, it is Phil’s own material that best focuses us on the diminutive masters work.

Oli, Alain & Roger

It is ironic that it has taken someone from the antipodes to put a fine lens on the inner workings of Petrucciani’s music.  Step by step as the material progresses we are granted the most intimate of glimpses.  Guided into a private world that only Phil Broadhurst has been able to reveal. This is the power of Jazz at its best.  Being able to dive deeper into the meaning of a tune as inner forms and colours unfold.   What is already wonderful is somehow made better or revealed afresh.

Petrucciani may have been small in stature but his percussive playing and unusually bold voicings have marked him out as a heavyweight.  His legacy is in fact so strong as to be virtually unassailable.  A few European tribute bands have recycled his compositions but there are few if any sound-a-likes (as happened with Evans).  Phil and the band made no attempt at slavish imitation; they did better than that.  They captured the essence of the music.

I suspect that Phil Broadhurst is one of the worlds foremost authorities on Michel Petrucciani and this is our good fortune.

We heard many of the tunes from the album, such as Phil Broadhurst’s own composition ‘Orange’ and Petrucciani’s  ‘Brazilian like’.   The material had not only been updated but we also heard some new material which Phil had written.  The band was playing up a storm and it was great to see Roger back after a successful trip gigging in Australia.  His tenor is always on fire and Phil and he sparked off each other as the night progressed.  Roger always watches the others carefully during gigs.  He watches them until he is ready to solo.  Then he leans back and takes off like a Titan rocket, leaving an open-mouthed audience in his slipstream.

Roger laying out before he unleashes hellfire

With Alain on drums delivering a flurry of beats, a fiery solo or whispering poetically on brushes the traps could not have been in better hands (he has become a favourite of mine and he will be missed when he goes overseas).  Oli’s playing is always worth hearing and he delivered strong bass lines and gave the band the support they needed.  He had been a little low in the mix for the first few numbers and that is a pity because what he has to say is worth hearing.   Once the sound had been adjusted it was if the jazz universe had suddenly fallen into place.

This was to be the bands last outing before Tauranga.  The group is finalists in the Jazz Tui awards and a play-off will occur Saturday night between The Phil Broadhurst Quartet (Delayed Reaction), The Tim Hopkins Trio (Seven) and the Roger Fox Big Band (Journey Home).  I have heard and reviewed all three bands and I know most of the musicians. This will be a tough call for the judges.

The Band is: Phil Broadhurst (leader, comp, piano), Roger Manins (tenor), Oli Holland (bass), Alain Koetsier (drums).